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on earth. we live on the frozen tundra and in the searing deserts. we live in thriving cities of millions and in isolated camps of a few dozen. some societies seem simple because they are small and their members are self-sufficient and use simple tools. others seem complex because they have large populations and people depend on each other for food and goods and use sophisticated technology. in between, there is a range that fills the spectrum. all of these differences are cultural, learned behavior, the result of a complex interaction between our inventiveness and our natural environments. as we search for new horizons, our inventiveness thrusts us across the boundaries of space, into new worlds. this new view of earth dispels an ancient myopia -- the artificial boundaries of our states and the politics that often divide us. here is a vision of one planet and one family of humankind. but the view from earth reminds us of a common human dilemma, the rise and fall of our many ways of life. here, among the ruins of ancient civilizations, archaeologists are retracing the steps in a long and
north of cape may, atlantic city. but i just don't want you to focus on those cities. does it make that turn left in time? it didn't going left right now, and sometimes they wait. sometimes computers aren't perfe perfect, and why aren't they perfect? the atlantic ocean is a fast space, we don't have weather balloons out there. we have drop sons out of noaa weather radio. here it is, category 1, about an 80-mile-per-hour storm, right now as it makes landfall tomorrow night. and if there's any change to the forecast at all, i would say that's a little bit faster. the numbers bring in landfall the eye, but don't focus on 8:00, because a lot of the storm will be onshore, half of it will be onshore, even before the eye gets there, wherever it gets. you have to understand that things are going to start to go bad from here. this is how good it's going to get for the next 36 hours. no matter where with we are in here, this sides of it is so dangerous because the wins are coming in here. on up here into period of time. all the way here into tom's river and all of this has wind this way, the
. it's not all about today's rally and not all about markets. wall street preparing for citi's conference call coming up at 4:30 p.m. eastern time, 30 minutes away, after the shocking resignation today of ceo vikram pandit. you can hear that call straight away live coming up in a few minutes. we'll take you on that call. kayla is here first with this evolving story. over to you, kayla. >> thanks, maria. we have -- i want to run through what we know so far right now. let's think about this turn of events for citigroup and how this came about. we know from sources that the board has been ramping up this search for the last several weeks. we don't know exactly the catalyst for that, but they did start planning for succession back in august. now, as far as what we know, maria, vikram pandit told you that he gave a call to citi board chairman mike o'neill after the earnings call yesterday to discuss the fact that he was ready go. now, in the wake of that period of time, we don't exactly know what happened during those last few hours. we know that mike o'neill did call several memb
of this place. in october of 2009 i came with my crew for three days just as an experiment and film in the city just as an outsider. talked to a few people. absolutely riveretted by the people and the plays. i thought there's definitely a movie here. we need to make a film in detroit. host: when impacted, i read your father had an impact on you watching him and his business over the years. guest: , that's right, my father is had a manufacturing company. he really like in the 1980s with the rise in japan had to innovate and come up up with new ideas and making it difficult to create products. he started engineering complicated things that couldn't be replicated or stolen or easily made overseas. that's now his business arrived. i kind of had a front row seat to what it was like going you in the 1980s. how he survived was interesting it was all about being nimble and innovative. which i think detroit needs and the rest of the country pretty much needs right now. host: his business partners over the years, around detroit moved out of there to mexico or some other place other than the united st
of mesoamerica, the ancient maya created magnificent city-states. here three million people once lived. in the earliest cradle of civilization, ancient mesopotamian farmers once made these deserts bloom. halfway around the world, in california, are clues to understanding the fall of mesopotamia, as farmers here struggle to overcome a threat to this fertile garden land. the ruins of ancient societies may hold keys to our own survival as, out of the past, archaeologists explore one of the greatest of mysteries -- the decline and fall of grand civilizations. mission control: ignition... and liftoff. liftoff... keach: for more than five millennia, humankind has seemed to dominate earth, both creating and destroying grand civilizations. each of these human experiments has changed our planet. this high vantage point brings us a new and sobering view. for the first time, we behold our world as finite, limited. on the darkened face of earth, the lights of cities record the expansion of our kind. just 50 years ago, two billion people lived on earth. today our global population has reached five
where their hearts are offered to gods who sanctioned conquest. every city and town in the empire pays tribute in exact amount and kind as specified by the aztecs, or risks horrible consequences. in the forests and jungles of other realms, maya kings rule great cities with the force of their own personalities. they build temples and huge stone billboards to prop up royal dynasties that have little actual power. they perform gruesome rituals that require the skins of other people. they go to war and capture players for their ball games -- games where the losers never play again. today, inside ancient pyramids, archaeologists face real danger to bring the story of these kings and their politics out of the past. before the arrival of europeans, two extraordinary civilizations flourished in mesoamerica. both the aztecs and the maya had cultures of startling sophistication, and political systems that were enormously complex. archaeologists are intrigued by ancient political systems. they want to know how these systems were organized and how they evolved. archaeologist arthur demarest. throu
buildings and cities. there was a project in copenhagen. the mayor came to us with a very precise question which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50s arm every day. -- 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. the king collect information. -- they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. a convicted on facebook. -- you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. publicly it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. -- hopefully, it will be here next
previously served as citigroup of europe. the changes come one day after citi's earnings beat expectation in a conference call which, of course, jim said absolutely nothing about this. >> no. this was the first quarter that was the break out quarter for international. first time that i felt that the company had put a lot of its problems behind it. best knit interest margin. we only had a couple of banks report. people are trying to present this this was logical, this was in the works. this was the least logical, least in the works. corbat terrific. he ran holdings. 48 hours did we know this? i don't know. i got to tell you that the people that i talked to at citi, to say not in the works is being underplayed. >> there's shock at least among a handful of people who i talk to regularly at senior who are senior but no way aware of this. they are shocked. they heard it about an hour prior to the announcement being put out there. and, you know, it seems as though we don't know at this point, although we listen eed t andrew ross sorkin's report right now. there was some contention between board
based? >> new york city. >> which of those documentaries made it biggest? >> jesus camp. we made a film called "jesus camp." we lost to al gore convenient truth. we all knew we were going to lose. it really sort of struck a nerve. it was really a look at the evangelical right through the eyes of children who are being home schooled and creationism, etcetera. it was at that time in 2007 a real window into this world. we impact judgment on the kids. sort of put a face on the nameless christian right. christian right responsible for electing george bush. for us, we went in and met these children and their families. we realized pretty quickly that these were the so-called foot soldiers for the right wing of the republican party. they also just believers and religious people and you know, going to the beat of their own drum. really, it was eye opening for us. we really tried to just paint the picture of how things are with these communities without passing any judgment. >> i saw that documentary and he question as i was watching, why did this camp let you in? >> the families are proud how
from ocean city, maryland but right now let's take it to jeff flock in point pleasant beach new jersey. jeff? jeff: a little bit of ground zero for you, liz, at this hour south jersey really in the sights of this and for the worst of the storm. it's extraordinary in i have not covered a hurricane that has been -- the on set of which has been like this, which is just steady blowing, raining, coming at you, a sandblasting you, and no let-up. usually there's a let-up. usually there are fingers, there are ribbons of intensity that come in. this is just all blow coming straight at you. take a look at this sea foam on the beach, and i will tell you, we are not that far away from low tide. the key is going to be tonight when we get to high tide here because you see that surf behind me, the wind that has been pushing that surf begins to then cooperate with the tide at about 7:16 local time here in point pleasant beach new jersey and that begins to drive that water inland. that's what's going to do all the damage. not so much the wind. there's minor wind damage so far. it is going to be that wa
heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after th
to be presenting our first award. we like to invite the newly appointed trustee of city college in san francisco louis santos to the stage. [applause] our latina heritage education award this year goes to the new superintendent of the san francisco school district. ms. carranza. [applause] . ritual carranza was sworn in as the new superintendent of the district on june 27 of this year. richard held a position of director of instruction and social justice at the district since 2009. richard lead the implementation of the strategic plan. his responsibilities include the redesign of the district's central office to support school sites and core curriculum to achieve more equitable educational outcomes for our children. after entering the school system speaking no english he knows how powerful education can be and in advancing our community. please let's give a round of applause to our education award. [applause] >> thank you. if you won't mind staying for a moment so we can present our next award to the next honoree and it's a new category tonight and it goes to a innovative program at missio
about emergency response. sarah is live in ocean city with how they are preparing. with tony. to begin how bad is this going to be? >> i have a little bit of good news. it does not look like maryland is going to get the worst case scenario. this is monday night and tuesday we're talking about. the route most of the weekend, there will not be a lot going on -- threw out most of the weekend, there will not be a lot going on. over on the right-hand side of your screen, you can see the center of the storm. that starts to produce some heavy rain. by the time we get into monday morning. at the center of the storm, it does not come up the chesapeake bay. that is most certainly good news. we're still going to get some heavy rain and wind gusting between 30 and 50 miles per hour. it will be much colder on tuesday, it might even be snowing in parts of maryland. it does not look like it is going to come up the chesapeake bay with a big storm surge. rob is in the middle river, where there used to that staff. >> a lot of people are getting their boats out. you can see behind me, people are getting
collection of city-states. at palenque, tonina, bonampak and other cities, dynastic kings ruled absolutely, controlling trade and tribute. they presided over intricate hierarchies of nobles and officials at courts resplendent with works of art. maya culture, shrouded in a mystery as dense as the forests in which it took root, revealed itself fitfully over three centuries. when the ruins in the jungle were first discovered, there was no way of understanding how the civilization was organized. so it's really through the inscriptions that we've been able to identify kings, to find out their capitals, their seats of power. and through this, we recognize now that there were many kingdoms. there was no unified maya state. there wasn't even just a few states. there were many, many states. (narrator) the first inroads into understanding the maya were made by spanish missionaries in the 16th and 17th centuries who followed in the imperial wake of hernan cortes. their "discoveries" included the ruins at copan. but interest in the st civilization began to accelerate in the 18th century when father an
takes as her husband, lover and king. and this is called the return. a lament was raised in the city. my lady weeps bitterly for her young husband. anana weeps bitterly for her young husband. woe for her husband, woe for her young love, woe for her house, woe for her city. dimusi was taken captive in aruk. he will no longer bathe in aradu. he will no longer treat the mother of anana of his mother. he will no longer perform his sweet task among the maidens of the city. he will no longer raise his sword higher than the kugar of priests. great is the grief of those who mourn for dimusi. anani wept for dimusi. gone is my husband, my sweet husband. gone is my sweet love. my beloved has been taken from the city. oh, you flies of the steppe, my beloved bride groom has been taken from me before i could wrap him with a proper shroud. the wild bull lives no more. his shepherd, the wild bull, lives no more. dimusi, the wild bull, lives no more. i ask the hills and valleys where is my husband. i say to him, i can no longer bring him food. i can no longer serve him drink. the jackel lies in his bed.
it will be adding about 50,000 to its payroll. awild poisonous are hiring workers as well this year. city officials in oakland are looking at new ways to china curve of the violence will explore that problem coming up with the kron 4 news continues >> and we're back is for 14 a harvard professor has won the nobel prize for economics. >> he got a call from the committee early this morning and had to be convinced that it was not a prank. he will share the $1.2 million prize with a ucla professor they both did work on mathematics in supplying the principles of supply and demand in innovative ways they are the upper seventies for san leandro. meet a is for walnut creek. pittsburgh 85 degrees and alameda gets to a comfortable 75 degrees. of our friends in the north bay to match their mid '80s of novato. 82 in san raphael 82 in petaluma. ocean beach 66 degrees in downtown san francisco a nice pleasant 74 degrees. here's a look at your 7 day her around the bay forecast. we are warming things up tomorrow and thursday. thursday looks great! light summer conditions. plenty of fault in some areas of morning f
in because the city determined high temperatures and low humidity make any activities here too dangerous. it has schools taking precautions and shades are up, teachers encouraging students to drink lots of water. the principle principal cancelled activities such as soccer during recess. and there are water fountains are a popular attraction. >> i was thinking hopefully, it's open. it's very, very, so hot today. >> the forecast calls forts to drop the ranger just told me the park will remain closed through tomorrow. >> and to get relief from the heat crowds are flocking to the beach. check out baker beach. there are people there bravely getting into the water. it's quite cold. and there is a san francisco man arrested for kidnapping a 9-year-old girl is now facing new charges. >> this 25-year-old accused in a second incident this one in daily city. and according to prosecutors he hid in a bathroom and took inappropriate photos of 9-year-old girls by reaching underneath the stall. is he in jail for groping another 9-year-old and carrying her off campus. investigators say she reported the c
always been steady. it is a tale of two cities. this stock should continue to fall the market and its self, a solid company, they will continue to grow and continue to be profitable and continued to go up. ibm will sell off a little bit. if the fundamentals are great. david: put that back on the screen, we can see it popped a little bit above the end of the day trade but right now trading a little bit below, the expectations were so high, they tried to lower them a little bit, but not enough, traders are not thrilled. the board of directors of citigroup elected ceo after the ousting. so what does a shakeup mean for the bank? liz: joining us now, jim rogers, private investor of a gift. this announcement is very heavy. the guy under him out. would you buy the stock here? >> not with my money or your money. i wonder how he got the job in the first place. here is a guy who failed as a hedge fund manager, all of a sudden sold citibank. david: you are wrong. he succeeded as a hedge fund because he sold his hedge fund for $800 million to citi. >> you are exactly right. the hedge fund with a
. >> unemployment dropped in some cities. it is still bad news. we'll tell you why when we come back. ♪ ♪ hey honey. you can be my drug, my new prescription. at shell, we believe the world needs a broader mix of energies. that's why we're supplying natural gas to generate cleaner electricity... that has around 50% fewer co2 emissions than coal. and it's also why, with our partner in brazil, shell is producing ethanol - a biofuel made from renewable sugarcane. >>a minute, mom! let's broaden the world's energy mix. let's go. ♪ >> good morning, back now at 5:15. this is what you missed while you were sleeping. chicago teachers approving a new contract two weeks after ending their strike. it gives them a average of a seven percent raise over three years. teachers currently make 76,000 in the chicago area. the tigers and miguel cabrera now wears the crown. [applause] he is the first triple crown winner in 45 years. royal fans giving him a standing ovation. he led with a 343 batting range. 43 home runs and rbies. way to go. time now for good news talking . this morning, we are hearing from you, the vot
value brand. era detergent. a lot of fight for a little dough. every year we pick a new city to explore. but thanks to hotwire, this year we got to take an extra trip. because they get us ridiculously low prices on really nice hotels and car rentals. so we hit boston in the spring-- even caught a game. and with the money we saved, we took a trip to san francisco. you see, hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can guarantee their low prices. so, where to next? how about there? ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ ♪ ♪ chicago police work around the clock to try to keep the streets safe but they do not always catch the bad guy. one detective is leading the search for a criminal that did get away he has been at loose for two years now fugitive hunters are asking for your help. >> he is well known especially in the communities that have latin kings representing them and man with a checkered criminal past and a list of aliases. he came to the u.s. when he was a teenager. he has been in the united states the majority of his life and soon fell into th
endorsements today from the denver post, the tampa bay times. the salt city tribune. yes, the salt city tribune, an utah paper endorsing obama. that's good for him. he seems to have stopped the bleeding according to a lot of polls, however, he has got to go into the next debate, the next set of questions and smile. we need a president who sat there and smile, we need the president reassure us. when we see him smile everybody is happy. he has a number of things he needs to talk about. the supreme court, climate change, iraq and the fiscal cliff. he has not talked at all about the fiscal cliff. it is coming. whoever is elected will be totally responsible for that. he went on "the daily though." this is what he said with jon stewart. >> obama: the stakes could not be bigger, war peace, supreme court, women's right to choose, whether we're creating jobs in this country or whether they're getting shipped overseas, whether our kids are getting the best education they can. all of that stuff is at stake. there is no excuse not to vote. >> of course there is no excuse not to vote. but you see the presid
to show your passion, head to city hall, the mayor will host a rally outside city hall. that is set for 10:30. the mayor is encouraging you to wear your orioles aren't. folks visiting our you local page have a spirit down their fingertips. they even have been o. and check out these black and orange spirit nails. roblin from newark, delaware -- their loyalty is more than skin deep as they show us their ink. all you have to do is click on you local. baltimore county superintendent has named the department's first will save the cheap. the baltimore sun reports the former head of student support services will be the new exhibit of the director of school safety and security. they created the position after the shooting in the high school, and after there's a gun brought to middle school weeks later. new numbers this morning as reports continue to come in from patients developing final meningitis uncontaminated steroid injections. jennifer franciotti joins us live from the health department with the latest numbers. good morning. >> good morning. they have. arundal meningitis has been reported no
city denied. "fox and friends" starts right now. ♪ >> gretchen: good morning, we start with an extreme weather alert. devastation sandy has left behind unimaginable and cities must begin the grueling recovery . the super storm killed 55 men, women and children and first responders. estimates of the physical damage are at 20 billion dollars and the recover will have to wait. eight million people are in the dark and aren't expected to get power back for weeks. hardest hit is new jersey, new york and pennsylvania. meanwhile, the president of the united states asked mayor bloomburg, i would like to take a look at all of the damage and mayor bloomburg had a press conference and said we are flattered by the fact that the president of the united states would like to come and visit us, but not right now and we are really busy and the first responders need to pay to exeem put things back in order. it would be great if the president goes to new jersey and the president will tour the devastation with the chief executive new jersey chris christy. >> gretchen: when the president comes the city is s
on today--hope slogan. that romney says that hope is not a strategy for dealing with the middle east. city hall was one of the buildings vandalize and oakland last night. there were various buildings tax throughout the downtown area happening all around 7:00 p.m. after a protest. people they targeted restaurants cars storefronts and the oakland tribune building. they joined >> they only lasted four innings killing of four rounds. bottom of the fifth four to nothing and the giants get their first hit of the game. they only have to for the night. the crowd finally starts to get into that at this point but the reds just keep rolling. nine nothing to the reds. the reds lead the best of the series to nothing. no national team has ever come back from a two game deficit. the athletics are also in the same hole. top of the third inning coco crisp is tagged out. it's 21 to oakland. they missed the catch with two runs scored. the strike goes up 3 to at that point. the strike goes on to win this game five to four in the bottom of the ninth inning. the athletics return home for hopefully three games w
park city. thanks. we're displaced and what we're seeing in scott's shot is a big reason for it. >> it makes a lot of sense for everyone to clear out because -- don't need me to tell you which way the wind blows but it's clear that it makes sense to close. i remember in 1985. i had gone to goldman that morning. young guy working at goldman. we thought the stock market was going to open. looked like it would open. there was trading and next thing you know i was playing cards. >> the question is if you were just to close the physical trading floor but keep electronic trading open, how robust would volumes be and how wimpy would markets be and disservice to investors if you maintain that market open. >> there's a big emphasis on market stability right now and of course on liquidity and volatility as well. there was a real issue out there that with not much participants in the market with main trading floor closed, people having trouble getting in and then people having trouble getting out, what's the risk/reward ratio and risk got higher as people were unable to get in. let's bring
acting like ice on the roads. >> thank you. the powerful waves took a toll on ocean city. sandy eroded some of the beaches. most people agree they got off fairly well. >> you heard about how bad this was going to be. we were lucky. it is weird looking at it. >> delmarva received no reports of any power outages. all things are still a go for city.nter fest ocean take a look at this. this is a scene from western maryland where they are digging out from almost two feet of snow and wind gusts of 60 miles per hour. this shot shows trees that toppled like toys. keep submitting your pictures to u local and our website, >> if you have damage from sandy, homeowners should take pictures of the damage. put a tarp over a roof. be careful about doing too much before getting a visit from your insurance rept. >> have an insurance adjuster comes out to assess the damage. >> residents with questions can call the maryland insurance association. >> flooding in howard county cause some problems along the little patuxent river. power to the plant was knocked out by the storm. a full audit has b
not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north county times" -- the assets are collapsing in value. they bought it for $12 million, sold his house for $18 million. putting aside that, these properties can be acquired and done with resume. this is not an expensive problem defects. i think that is an important -- an expensive problem to fix. i think that is an important thing to remember. i have a budget of a little more than $1 million, which is a lo
of the city. he will no longer raise his sword higher than the kugar of priests. great is the grief of those who mourn for dimusi. anani wept for dimusi. gone is my husband, my sweet husband. gone is my sweet love. my beloved has been taken from the city. oh, you flies of the steppe, my beloved bride groom has been taken from me before i could wrap him with a proper shroud. the wild bull lives no more. his shepherd, the wild bull, lives no more. dimusi, the wild bull, lives no more. i ask the hills and valleys where is my husband. i say to him, i can no longer bring him food. i can no longer serve him drink. the jackel lies in his bed. you ask me about his reed pipe. the wind must play it for him. you ask me about his sweet songs. the wind must sing them for him. satur, the mother of dimusi, weeps for his song. once my boy wandered so freelly on the steppe, now he is captured. once dimusi wandered so freely on the steppe, now he is bound. the ewe gives up her lamb, the goat gives up her kid. my heart plays the reed pipe of mourning. in a place where he once said my mother will ask for me, no
. we're on the road in los alamos, new mexico, part of our 100-city tour. the u.s. military has deployed a secret task force to jordan to help respond to the ongoing violence in syria. "the new york times" reports a contingent of more than 150 planners and other specialists is tasked with helping jordanian forces handle incoming syrian refugees, prepare for syria's potential loss of control over its chemical weapons, and respond should the turmoil in syria spread more widely throughout the middle east. the mission also reportedly has discussed contingency plans to insulate jordan from the conflict, with talks of a u.s.- backed buffer zone along the syria-toward a murdeborder. the u.s. military presence in jordan comes just as the jordanian monarchy is facing its largest protests since the start of the arab spring. thousands of jordanians marched in the capital demanding economic opportunities and democratic reforms. turkey forced a syrian passenger airplane to land in and confiscated its cargo is tensions between the two countries continue to rise. the airplane was traveling fro
it's simple. you get an i.d. a lot of people who don't drive in the inner city don't need driver's licensees. the hoops you have to go through are a real barrier to vote in. this is an important decision. i'm hoping you see decisions like this in other states. >> let me wrap up the other conversation we were having. i know you wanted to jump in on what you heard from congressman price. >> first of all, congressman said it was the 47% video was something that was done at a fund-raiser in the debate will be an opportunity to talk unfiltered. i don't know why anyone should not assume remarks he didn't know were being recorded to a group of donors were completely unfiltered. exactly what mitt romney was thinking. when congressman price said the democrats are running a divide and conquer campaign, if you tell a bunch of donors, you're not worried about 47%. that is divide and conquer. the final point is the passage you read from david brooks is what i'm talking about. mitt romney did not have a successful business career because he's an idiot or empty suit. he's got real strengths. he
went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with the citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] [ male announcer ] get more access with the citi card. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax worksdifferently than other laxatives. it dws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to fe great. miralax. >>. >>> when 9/11 happened in new york city they waived the stafford action. we can't expect new york city to rebuild on its own. forget that dollar you got to put in. that was the right thing to do. when hurricane andrew struck in florida, people said look at this devastation. we don't expect you to come up with almighty hand, here is the money to rebuild. you are part of the american family. what is happening now in new orleans? where is your dollar?
. >> on earnings and revenues sending citi shares higher. u.s. mortgage business and lending mexico helped boost results. >> microsoft's back in the music business unveiling a service that could compete with the likes of pandora and itunes. we have an exclusive with the head of their interactive entertainment straight ahead. softbank to buy 70% of sprint for $20 billion marking the largest ever foreign acquisition by a japanese company bringing together the third biggest mobile carriers of japan and the united states. it was said, i'm a man and every man wants to be number one, not number two or number three. masayoshi son. >> audacious two. one assumes he is rational as well. usually only rational people have that access to -- >> godzilla-like approach and looked like mothra. >> you know, it is a large deal. no way around that and, of course, somewhat complex try to break it down for you if you're a sprint shareholder you'll have the opportunity to ee will exto get either 730 in cash and/or own 30% of newco, new sprint and it will probably end up splitting 55/45. for 55% of your holdings so 730
and cities in the region. at this stage everyone is confident that the staging process, the positioning of resources, commodities, and equipment that will be needed to respond to the storm are in place. as craig has emphasized, this has not made landfall yet. we do not yet know where it will hit, where we're going to see the biggest impacts. that is exactly why it is so important for us to respond big and fast as local information starts coming in. i want to thank all of the members of the team for the outstanding work they're doing, but the other thing that makes this storm unique is that we anticipate it will be slow moving. meaning it may take a long time not only to clear, but to get, for example, power companies back in to clear out the trees and put things back in place so that folks can start moving back home. my main message to everyone involved is that we have to take this seriously. the federal government is working effectively with state and local governments. it will be very important that populations in the impacted states take this seriously, listen to your state and local
. when i was a city councilman in lyndhurst, ohio, i introduced the first property-tax rollback in the history of our city. we give tax relief to senior citizens and working families. i worked in a bipartisan fashion -- and we reconstructed the oversight to the workers' compensation investment fund. i worked in a bipartisan way to pass down the budget and try to keep young people in ohio. identified the exports with ohio and worked in a bipartisan way to manage the finances in the state of ohio where we have the highest rating on our bonds and investment and voluntarily cut our budget two years in a row. >> i would emphasize that he voted with his own party -- he voted with them 96% of the time. the only time he doesn't is if the interest group does not have a better offer. he voted against his leadership to satisfy the pay lenders and raised a lot of money. there is nothing in his elektra -- in his electoral records that would show that he ever stands up to his political party on anything significant. >> is there one big area of disagreement you have with mitt romney, mandel? >
been but that was where you were born so you came to the inner city to work with high school dropouts. how did that inform the person you have become? walsh: i try to dedicate my life to helping those less fortunate than i. most of my life prior to running for two or three years ago was working with those less fortunate. i expect a good number of years working in the inner city trying to improve educational opportunities for young african-american, hispanic and white children. i taught american government and american history. >> moderator: i need to ask one final quick question. ms. duckworth you were born in thailand and american father who was in the military and your mother is tied. you traveled around and eventually ended up in hawaii. duckworth: i ended up in hawaii because my dad lost his job. we ended up on food stamps. thank god for the programs that allowed me to go to college. if you talk about it, it's the hard work and that personal responsibility and that struggle. >> moderator: with that we have to bring this form to an end but thank you very much tammy duckworth and co
expected to attract a million people to the city. for anyone thinking of attending, there's a warning from officials, plan ahead and bring your patience. we have live team coverage. tell us about fleet week events. with begin with matt keller on the crush of people descending on the family. >> reporter: we're here at at&t park. expected to bring traffic to a standstill. >> performed for thousands of people in golden gate park to end the first day of the bluegrass festival. >> it was a huge event. been mellow. >> with events like this all across the city. the traffic will be anything but mellow. expecting a million visitors this weekend for the hardly strictly bluegrass festival. cup races, castro street fair and playoff games. >> if anything else, take public transportation. >> police and transportation officials recommend you do the same. extra bart cars, buses, fer ees and taxi's are being put into service. several streets around golden gate park and all but one. . >> i know it's convenient to drive into the city. once you get into the city, you may find it's as convenient as to take pu
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